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20121101
20121130
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KQED (PBS) 28
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English 28
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
not get home. i am exhausted. i cannot stand. >> at the same hospital earlier today, egypt prime minister come here to try to broker a cease- fire but also expressing his full support for hamas. >> israel's operation in gaza was a disaster. this is aggression and we as egyptians will not remain silent. >> in the past 24 hours, israel has launched more than 300 air strikes, some in residential areas. by bombing this building in the heart of gaza city, israel says it is attacking what it calls hamas' terrorist infrastructure. but look how close this building is to schools and homes. the potential for civilian casualties is very high. if israel totally undermines hamas'authority in gaza, what will come in its place? tonight, israel continues to pound gaza and the militants fire out. today, the hopes of a cease-fire ends with fears of all-out war. >>> for more on the violence at a regional implications, i spoke a short time ago to erect, a fellow at the washington institut for near east policy. how much difference does egypt's new government make to that crucial relationship with israel? >> i
in america and around the globe. across egypt today there have been violent protests following the president's decision to grant himself sweeping new powers. buildings belonging to the muslim brotherhood party have been ransacked, with some set on fire. the president says he has taken on the powers to help steer the country through the difficult transition to democracy, but critics claim he is trying to make himself a new pharaoh. >> fury in egypt as president morsi gives himself a big, new powers. there were protests across the country. in cairo, the crowds flooded back to tahrir square, where last year they celebrated the ousting of hosni mubarak. now they say the new president has become even more of the dictator with an edict saying the courts cannot challenge him. >> he is taking more power than mubarak. >> it was only days ago that the president was basking in the world and american approval as he helped mediate the gaza ceasefire. now washington has expressed its concern about the president's latest edict. the president came out to tell his supporters that he was only acting to defend
and of the opposition. >> brown: then, we update the growing unrest in egypt where the islamist-dominated assembly fast-tracked a vote on a new constitution. >> suarez: we continue our conversations with newly-elected senators. tonight, arizona republican, jeff flake. >> >> we're at a point on the fiscal issues where we have to reach an agreement and perhaps as we do so that will start the stage for the other areas as well. >> brown: fred de sam lazaro has the story of a minnesota non- profit that celebrates diversity and the power of dance. >> they're one of the few companies that within their own work spans so many kinds of different style, from classical ballet to modern dance to contemporary performance to urban dance. >> suarez: and we look at college sports teams, moving from conference to conference, playing a game of musical chairs where the end goal is more money from lucrative tv contracts. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connect
of the replenishing of arms going into gaza. i think there is probably from the hamas side with egypt as egypt is probably promising the opening of passages which up until now at the descriptions have not really opened. and there may be something to do with what the israelis will be allowing into gaza, the fact is the israelis allowed much more into gaza, they still want to be able to check ships to be sure that big weapons aren't coming in that way but i think that is probably the outline that hamas probably also wants commitments from the israelis about not going after their leadership. >> elliott, do you think this is a deal that the israelis will believe in and think acceptable for them? >> i do. i think one really critical part of it is the egyptian side, that is policing that border, something that the number rec regime did not do. the egyptians will promise to do that and the question then is, will the new government do it? and keep at least the long range iranian rockets from entering gaza? will they really police it and really close the tunnels i think that is going to be quite criti
war and with elections they decided enough for now. >> this is a critical moment for the region. egypt posing new government is assuming the responsibility and leadership that has long made this country's " -- a cornerstone of regional stability and peace. >> the site of weapons supplied by the u.s. bombing arabs once again means that too much american craze is something that no leader in the american -- and no leader in the arab east wants right now. this morning as negotiations reached a critical stage, they were burying the night's dead. egypt is struggling to recreate itself. >> there has been a lot of cross border violence. there is no reason to oppose a new one either. not unless there is a change. >> @ gaudette's main hospital there was no -- more support from the east. libyans in turkey helping hamas believe that history is on its side. >> eight days have helped the hands of the zionist to submit to history. >> many more palestinians and israelis have been killed and wounded. death and injuries feel the same on either side. making a cease-fire in a conflict this bitter, which h
crisis in egypt. >> suarez: then, in her final report from turkey, margaret warner looks at the growing clout of syria's kurdish minority, and the impact that's having on the other side of the border. >> brown: when does a co-worker count as a supervisor? that question was before the supreme court today in a case about harassment. marcia coyle explains. >> suarez: and we examine new figures from the pew research center showing that young voters played a decisive role reelecting president obama. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: a still tentative american economy looked o
in tahrir square-- familiar scenes in egypt nearly two years ago that led to the fall of longtime leader hosni mubark. but today, they were aimed at egypt's new leader. in the coastal city of alexandria, opponents set fire to the offices of president mohammed morsi's political party, the muslim brotherhood. there and elsewhere in egypt today, the president's critics and supporters clashed in the streets over his decree yesterday exempting himself from judicial review, and giving him authority to take steps against "threats to the revolution." morsi, egypt's first freely elected president, took office in june. in recent days, he'd garnered worldwide praise for mediating a cease-fire between israel and hamas. today, he told a supportive crowd outside the presidential palace in cairo that granting himself sweeping powers was necessary to prevent figures from the old regime from halting progress. >> ( translated ): i haven't taken a decision to use it against anyone-- to go against anyone is something that i could never be associated with-- or announcing that i am biased towards anyone. howe
is is not so much hamas doing but it's the implication of the arab spring and today egypt is ruled not by president mubarak, whose regime shared israel's concern and adversity to hamas but by the muslim brotherhood that treats hamas as its prodigy, its kind of protectorate in gaza. and qatar -- in a similar fashion qatar is becoming more and more the financial backer of hamas in gaza. so you can argue that the good news is that hamas is further away from iran and from syria. the more radical governments in the region. closer to egypt and qatar who are less radical, more western oriented, more pro-american and with open channels to israel. >> rose: so what do you think is going to happen? >> i think a new cease-fire will be put in place. i hope it will happen within the next 24 hours to prevent and avoid and do without the ground invasion with its deadly cast and then whoever takes the place of jabbarry as the new leader of hamas will have to impose a cease-fire. while at the same time israel will have to let go some of its blockade of gaza. and i think both sides will try the best
. egypt's president is a leader of the muslim brotherhood. the assassination will be seen as a calculated and dangerous insult. egypt strongly condemns what israel is doing in gaza. this is an unacceptable act, and we deeply condemn it. >> what has changed since the war? the west and israel have lost their most reliable friend, and egypt's president mubarak. they saw him as an indispensable part of the solution at times like this. >> heightened tensions in the middle east tonight. in other news from around the world, the united nations secretary general ban ki moon has set a report on the failure to attack civilians. -- has said a report on the failure to attack civilians will have a profound impact. in iraq, simultaneous car bomb attacks across the country have killed at least 17 people. dozens were injured. the attack struck baghdad and other cities. it is not clear if the attacks are the work of one group. across europe, tens of thousands have taken to the streets in protest of rising unemployment and government austerity measures. workers in spain, portugal, greece, and italy went out
kathy kae. if egypt hijacking the revolution or protecting it? mr. claims his new -- mr. mursi claims his new powers after claiming to protect it. and we show how israelis and iranians are coming together for science. yes, you heard that right. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and elsewhere around the globe. tonight, tensions are still high in egypt days after muhammed mercy -- muhammed mursi took sweeping powers. he claimed that only sovereign matters would be protected from judicial review. but on the street, thousands gathered in cairo for the funeral of an activist who died during clashes last week. more protests were planned for tuesday. late today, however, the muslim brotherhood decided to postpone its rally saying that it wanted to support the president after an outbreak of violence. joining me now is a local supporter of the revolution that removed the president in art -- remove president mubarak from power. m do you mursi is trying to -- do you i is tryingdent murss to hijack the revolution? >> he forgets that this is not about the muslim brother
between the two sides were put off for now. egypt's foreign minister, mohammed kamel amr, announced the breakthrough with secretary of state hillary clinton at his side. >> egypt has exerted efforts and conducted intensive discussions since the renewed outbreak of hostilities in the gaza strip with all parties: the palestinian leadership, the these efforts and communications managed to reach an agreement to a ceasefire and the return of calm and halt of the violence and the bloodshed that was witnessed recently. >> the united states welcomes the agreement today for a ceasefire in gaza. for it to hold, the rocket attacks must end, a broader calm returned. in the days ahead, the united states will work with partners across region to consolidate this progess, improve conditions for the people of gaza, provide security for the people of israel. >> woodruff: a short time later this afternoon, israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu told reporters he leaves open the possibility of a ground invasion of gaza at a later date, but agreeing to a ceasefire made sense now. >> i know there are
to netanyahu, talk to president morsi of egypt. and he recognizes something that almost every president eventually discovers which is that america is still indispensable player when it comes to these sort of conflicts in the middle east. pete: still the indispensable player and hasn't changed with the arab spring? >> the arab spring hasn't changed that and you've seen the revolution of the arab spring and our relationship to it particularly in this relationship, this new partnership between president obama and president morsi of egypt. very interesting history. president morsi from the muslim brotherhood just a few weeks back before the election, the americans and the obama administration very upset at morsi for not doing more to protect the embassy in cairo during some of those protests there. this week, you saw this sort of new partnership developing and they were on the phone repeatedly. 11:30 at night. 2:30 in the morning from air force one. morsi was a key as far as he could see to solving this problem. he was investing a lot of his own capital with president obama was in this new
. around our house, all are civilians. no one is firing. >> egypt has denied reports to be arranged a truce. >> for more on the high stakes of this escalating violence, i folk with former senator george mitchell. -- i spoke with former senator george mitchell. thank you very much for joining me. neither side appears to be backing down. this is not going to be over in a few days. just how serious is this? could we be seeing the start of the war? >> it is a very serious issue. i've been saying for some time, nearly a year, there was a will that had created a false sense of security on all sides. the real danger is not so much from the internal conflict within gaza, it is given the highly unstable and volatile situation in the region, this could be a spark that lights a conflict that extent in other unpredictable ways. it is a very serious matter. >> are you seeing any signs of that happening imminently? >> there is a long pattern in history. neither side appears to be backing down. that is in the case in the past. in the past, they have found in their mutual interest to establish a cease-fire
by getting islamic jihad to make an agreement with israel that is somehow validated by egypt and other parties important to these groups. >> is the conflict still about israel's desire for security versus the palestinian need for statehood? is it more than that? >> that of course goes on. i think israel is focused on iran trying to build up the nuclear capability and what israel might feel it has to do to prevent that. the prospect that there would be attacks launched on israel. >> what role of the americans playing? not much evidence of them. >> the role seems to have been marginal. president obama and secretary clinton have been on the phone with world leaders. the channel in cairo is an intelligence channel. there might be american participation. that is not something we would hear about because it does involve participation by a high- level american official weekend see. >> thank you for joining us. >> rebels in colombia have called a truce at the start of peace talks with the government. they have become -- begun the first face-to-face negotiations in a decade aimed at ending conf
to give thanks to president morsi of egypt." across gaza, he's something of a new hero, and they're even impressed in israel. the egyptian president right now the best hope for peacekeeping here. >> egypt was able to regain it's regional role as a regional player, mediating between the israelis and the palestinians in convincing both of them to reach a ceasefire agreement. in the city, the flags, the rallies, talking up victory. in the countryside, the hamas song is, we're going to bomb tel aviv. but away from politics, what about people, lives disrupted by all this? yesterday we filmed awad and his mum sabbah taking shelter in a school in gaza city. frightened, disorientated, a severely disabled boy caught up in all this. today, diplomacy had delivered. sabbah was at home with the family in atatrah. >> it's good that we're okay. i'm very happy i can't believe it, i'm shivering. that face, sabbah said, means he's feeling happy and safe, and with an arm's round from brother mahmoud, and no sound of an explosion. >> sreenivasan: in israel, reserve troops began moving away from the border w
. protesters in egypt staged nationwide rallies today against egyptian president mohamed morsi and his muslim brotherhood. in cairo, more than 100,000 people filled tahrir square to condemn morsi's decree that makes his decisions immune to judicial review. earlier, there were clashes between protesters and police. the rallies were some of the largest since the overthrow of president hosni mubarak last year. in syria, government warplanes bombed towns in the north and east, in the face of new advances by rebel fighters. in one attack, the planes dropped barrels filled with explosives and gasoline just west of idlib city. reports of the dead ranged from five to 20. the regime is using intensive air raids to try to beat back rebel gains. forensic experts took samples from the remains of yasser arafat today, hoping to determine once and for all if the late palestinian leader was poisoned. arafat died in 2004. his body was briefly exhumed today in ramallah, on the west bank. we have a report from john ray of independent television news. >> reporter: eight years after they buried him they sealed ya
, in the north, rebels said they shot down a government fighter jet with an anti- aircraft missile. in egypt, the political crisis took a new turn, as two top appellate courts went on strike against president mohammed morsi. they said they won't return to work until morsi rescinds decrees giving himself near absolute power. at the same time, the supreme constitutional court rejected morsi's claims that it's undermining his government. >> ( translated ): the egyptian supreme constitutional court will not be terrorized from any threat or blackmail and it will not be subjected to any pressure from anyone, no matter how forcible the pressure. and the supreme constitutional court is ready to face this, whatever the consequences, which could be a high price, even if the price is the life of its judges. >> sreenivasan: the courts' actions came a day after nationwide protests against morsi's decrees. and late today, there was word the egyptian leader will address the country tomorrow about his actions and the response. rebels in eastern congo have begun pulling out of territory they seized from gove
. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> i'm kathy kay. egypt is young and fragile,
today after friday prayers came to an end. in egypt, crowds in cairo and alexandria waved palestinian flags and chanted anti-israeli slogans. thousands of people also turned out in yemen to denounce the israeli offensive. and in turkey, a one-time israeli ally, people in istanbul called for the death of the jewish state. >> brown: and for more on the conflict, we are joined by hisham melham, washington bureau chief for al- arabiya; and dan schueftan is director of national security studies center at the university of haifa. gentlemen, one thing i think a lot of people, myself included are wondering how did this flare-up seemingly so quickly. dan schueftan. >> well, since hamas took over we had for a while a thousand rockets per year, then came israeli escalation and-- and it went down to a small number of rockets every year, last year again we came to about a thousand rockets against israel. and this intensified in recent weeks to the point where israel had to take action. israel was saying for about two weeks, i mean people here were dealing with the elections and other things. but i
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)